Holistic Approach to Wellness

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that can occur in genetically predisposed people where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine.  It is estimated to affect 1 in 100 people worldwide.  2.5 million Americans are undiagnosed and are at risk for long-term health complications.

When people with celiac disease eat gluten (a protein found in wheat, rye and barley), their body mounts an immune response that attacks the small intestine. These attacks lead to damage on the villi, small fingerlike projections that line the small intestine, that promote nutrient absorption. When the villi get damaged, nutrients cannot be absorbed properly into the body.

Celiac disease is hereditary, meaning that it runs in families. People with a first-degree relative with celiac disease (parent, child, sibling) have a 1 in 10 risk of developing celiac disease.

Long Term Health Effects

Celiac disease can develop at any age after people start eating foods or medicines that contain gluten. Left untreated, celiac disease can lead to additional serious health problems. These include the development of other autoimmune disorders like Type I diabetes and multiple sclerosis (MS), dermatitis herpetiformis (an itchy skin rash), anemia, osteoporosis, infertility and miscarriage, neurological conditions like epilepsy and migraines, short stature, and intestinal cancers.

Treatment

Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is lifelong adherence to a strict gluten-free diet. People living gluten-free must avoid foods with wheat, rye and barley, such as bread and beer. Ingesting small amounts of gluten, like crumbs from a cutting board or toaster, can trigger small intestine damage.

Celiac disease is also known as coeliac disease, celiac sprue, non-tropical sprue, and gluten sensitive enteropathy.

Undiagnosed or untreated celiac disease can lead to:

Long-Term Health Conditions

  • Iron deficiency anemia
  • Early onset osteoporosis or osteopenia
  • Infertility and miscarriage
  • Lactose intolerance
  • Vitamin and mineral deficiencies
  • Central and peripheral nervous system disorders
  • Pancreatic insufficiency
  • Intestinal lymphomas and other GI cancers (malignancies)
  • Gall bladder malfunction
  • Neurological manifestations, including ataxia, epileptic seizures, dementia, migraine, neuropathy, myopathy and multifocal leucoencephalopathy

Other Autoimmune Disorders

In a 1999 study, Ventura, et al. found that for people with celiac disease, the later the age of diagnosis, the greater the chance of developing another autoimmune disorder.

Age of Diagnosis Chance of Developing Another Autoimmune Condition
2-4 10.5%
4 – 12 16.7%
12 – 20 27%
Over 20 34%

Autoimmune Conditions Associated with Celiac Disease

Autoimmune Condition Prevalence in CD Population
Addison’s Disease 5-12%
Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (Graves/Hashimoto’s) 2-7%
Autoimmune Hepatitis 3-6%
Crohn’s Disease 8.5%
Dermatitis Herpetiformis 25%
Gluten Ataxia 10-12%
Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy  5.7%
Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis  2.5-7%
Microscopic Colitis  4%
Multiple Sclerosis  11%
Peripheral Neuropathy  9%
Primary Bilary Cirrhosis  3-7%
Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis  3%
Psoriasis  4.3%
Scleroderma  4%
Sjögren’s Syndrome  4.5-15%
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus  4%
Ulcerative Colitis  3.6%

Biomed Res Int. 2013; 2013: 127589, Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010;4(6):767-780, Rheumatology (Oxford).2013 May;52(5):939-43.

CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS
CELIAC DISEASE CAN BE DIFFICULT TO DIAGNOSE BECAUSE IT AFFECTS PEOPLE DIFFERENTLY. THERE ARE ABOUT 300 KNOWN SYMPTOMS WHICH MAY OCCUR IN THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM OR OTHER PARTS OF THE BODY. SOME PEOPLE WITH CELIAC DISEASE HAVE NO SYMPTOMS AT ALL. HOWEVER, ALL PEOPLE WITH CELIAC DISEASE ARE STILL AT RISK FOR LONG-TERM COMPLICATIONS, WHETHER OR NOT THEY DISPLAY ANY SYMPTOMS.
DIGESTIVE SYMPTOMS ARE MORE COMMON IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN. HERE ARE THE MOST COMMON SYMPTOMS FOUND IN CHILDREN:

  • abdominal bloating and pain
  • chronic diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • constipation
  • pale, foul-smelling, or fatty stool
  • weight loss
  • fatigue
  • irritability and behavioral issues
  • dental enamel defects of the permanent teeth
  • delayed growth and puberty
  • short stature
  • failure to thrive

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Do You Have Celiac Disease?

Adults are less likely to have digestive symptoms, with only one-third experiencing diarrhea.  Adults are more likely to have:

  • unexplained iron-deficiency anemia
  • fatigue
  • bone or joint pain
  • arthritis
  • bone loss or osteoporosis
  • depression or anxiety
  • tingling numbness in the hands and feet
  • seizures or migraines
  • missed menstrual periods
  • infertility or recurrent miscarriage
  • canker sores inside the mouth
  • an itchy skin rash called dermatitis herpetiformis

For a complete list of symptoms, see the Celiac Disease Symptoms List PDF. 

  • SYMPTOMS AND CONDITIONS CHECKLIST

Most people with celiac disease are undiagnosed.   This checklist helps you document if you or your child have any of the common symptoms or conditions.  Share your checklist responses with your physician to determine if you or your child should have the celiac disease panel blood test.

This checklist is NOT a self-diagnosis tool. Diagnosis of celiac disease requires a celiac disease panel blood test and an endoscopic biopsy of your small intestine.

 

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